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Economists Peter Arcidiacono and Marjorie Mc Elroy of Duke and Andrew Beauchamp of Boston College examined an enormous trove of data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, more commonly known as The poll asked a broad range of questions about health and behavior—and the data set has become the basis of dozens of famed medical, sociological, and economic studies.

In this 1 hour talk, Dannielle Miller gives insight into the pain of today’s teen girls, who are facing body image crises, low self-esteem, and hypersexual portrayals of women by the media and advertisers.

Dannielle reveals why so many girls feel overwhelmed and are turning to binge drinking, self-harm or extreme diets - and she gives parents and educators the tools to help their girls bloom into happy, confident young women. Research tells us that friends are more important to teenage girls than even their parents or teachers.

Unsurprisingly, the majority of high school girls do not (though 50.1 percent of senior girls do).

Over the course of four years, the power shifts from the freshman girls who don't want to have sex to the senior boys who do. Though high-school girls don't really want to have sex, many more of them end up doing so in order to "match" with a high-school boy.

What the researchers looked for is called, in academic-speak, "matching": the likelihood and factors that lead to any individual partnering up.

(They looked only at opposite-sex relationships within the same school.) That's uncommon: Most academic studies on marriage and partner-matching use a technique called "," which looks at pre-existing couples and defines the characteristics they do and do not have in common.

Rather sweetly, the Add Health study considers two a pair when they hold hands, kiss, and say "I love you." (It seems to me this knocks most high-school relationships out of consideration, but the criteria are the criteria.) And when does that happen?

Boys and girls in the same grade account for about 42 percent of relationships, while older boys dating younger girls make up 40 percent of high-school relationships, and older girls dating younger boys make up 18 percent.

—interested in sex, whereas girls, no matter how boy-crazy, tend to focus on relationships.

Young men frequently fib about their sexual experience, whereas young women tend to be more truthful.

These are truisms known to anyone who has watched 10 minutes of a teen movie or spent 10 minutes in a high school cafeteria.

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