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Parallels Desktop for Mac is a hardware emulation virtualization software, using hypervisor technology that works by mapping the host computer’s hardware resources directly to the virtual machine’s resources.

Each virtual machine thus operates identically to a standalone computer, with virtually all the resources of a physical computer.

A new feature known as Coherence was added, which removed the Windows chrome, desktop, and the virtualization frames to create a more seamless desktop environment between Windows and Mac OS X applications.

This version also allowed users to boot their existing Boot Camp Windows XP partitions, which eliminated the need to have multiple Windows installations on their Mac.

Version 3.0 retained all of the functionality from previous versions and added new features and tools.

Support for Direct X 8.1 and Open GL A new feature called Smart Select offers cross OS file and application integration by allowing the user to open Windows files with Mac OS X programs and vice versa.

Released on June 15, 2006, it was the first software product to bring virtualization mainstream to Macintosh computers utilizing the Apple–Intel architecture (earlier software products ran PC software in an emulated environment).

Its name initially was 'Parallels Workstation for Mac OS X', which was consistent with the company's corresponding Linux and Windows products.

This name was not well received within the Mac community, where some felt that the name, particularly the term “workstation,” evoked the aesthetics of a Windows product.

Parallels agreed: “Since we've got a great Mac product, we should make it look and sound like a Mac product...”, it was therefore renamed ‘Parallels Desktop for Mac’.

Additionally, the lawsuit claimed that Parallels Desktop 2.5's compatibility with “two OStwo” showed that the two software products are run by essentially the same functional core.

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